Cruise Laws and Injury Claims

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While many general maritime laws apply to cruise ships, there are also specific cruise laws that are applicable only to the cruise ship industry.  For instance, while most admiralty and maritime matters are governed by a three-year statute of limitations, meaning that there is a three-year window in which a person can assert a claim pursuant to maritime injury law, cruise ships often limit the usual statute of limitations to one year, simply by placing a notice and/or provision on their passenger tickets.  Similarly, most cruise line tickets contain a forum selection clause, which requires that all disputes be litigated in Miami, Florida, which is the area where most major cruise lines are located.  Additionally, most cruise ships are registered in foreign countries, and fly foreign flags.  As a result, the maritime and admiralty law of the country in which the ship is registered may very well apply to some incidents that occur on cruise ships, particularly when the ship is in foreign waters or docked in a foreign country.

Cruise Ship Injury Claims

If a passenger is not aware of these exceptions to general maritime laws, he or she may end up with no recourse for a perfectly legitimate claim that he or she might have against a cruise line.  If you have been injured while on a cruise or if you believe that you have a claim against a cruise line, you should immediately contact a cruise ship injury attorney who specializes in the area of maritime law for assistance in determining your rights to recovery, and the viability and requirements of a suit against a cruise line.

 

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